Phillips Community College of the University of Arkansas is among 19 college and universities to be granted accreditation by the National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships (NACEP) Accreditation Commission.

Phillips Community College of the University of Arkansas is among 19 college and universities to be granted accreditation by the National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships (NACEP) Accreditation Commission.

NACEP is the primary membership organization that successfully helps students transition from high school to college through college credit courses.

NACEP's standards serve as the criteria for ensuring that the course content and expectations for student work in concurrent enrollment match those on the campus of the sponsoring college or university.

“As the availability of college credit opportunities for high school students expands, it is vital that we maintain quality to provide a meaningful collegiate experience for students,” commented Victoria Zeppelin, NACEP Accreditation Commission chair and director of CollegeNow at Tompkins Cortland Community College in New York. “The programs that received accreditation meet the established best practices in concurrent enrollment in the areas of curriculum, faculty, students, assessment and program evaluation.”

To earn accreditation from NACEP, concurrent enrollment programs conduct self-studies, document how the programs meet NACEP's 17 standards and participate in a rigorous peer-review process by NACEP representatives and the NACEP Accreditation Commission.

The NACEP accreditation is for seven years. During this period, the programs are expected to report program practices on a yearly basis.

Zeppelin added, “ NACEP accreditation is the hallmark of excellence, assuring that programs offer college courses that are as rigorous as courses on their campuses, thereby supporting student achievement and postsecondary success.

According to National Student Clearinghouse, 25 percent of the 2 million Associate and Bachelor degree recipients in 2014-15 took at least one dual or concurrent enrollment course during high school.

“Over the years, NACEP and its accredited programs have demonstrated that the academic integrity of college courses can be maintained in a high school setting,” stated Adam Lowe, NACEP's executive director. “These institutions have committed the necessary resources, particularly campus faculty time and effort, to ensure that appropriate levels of academic oversight occur.”