Labor Day I watched an old John Wayne film that I had probably seen at least a half-dozen times before – The Alamo. Though I have viewed several movies dealing with the famous battle at the old Texas mission, the Wayne version is still my favorite.

Historically speaking it is seriously flawed and loaded with inaccuracies created through "Hollywood's dramatic license". However the film still manages to depict the feeling of patriotic loyalty and the fear of imminent death. Images of the horrors of war are quite vivid throughout throughout the flick.

Labor Day I watched an old John Wayne film that I had probably seen at least a half-dozen times before – The Alamo. Though I have viewed several movies dealing with the famous battle at the old Texas mission, the Wayne version is still my favorite.

Historically speaking it is seriously flawed and loaded with inaccuracies created through "Hollywood's dramatic license". However the film still manages to depict the feeling of patriotic loyalty and the fear of imminent death. Images of the horrors of war are quite vivid throughout throughout the flick.

Set in 1836 in the then thinly populated Texas community of San Antonio, settlers prepared to make a stand for independence from the tyrannical rule of Mexico. There was no doubt that General Santa Anna was rapidly approaching San Antonio with a band of almost 3,000 well-trained fighting soldiers.

Colonel William Travis was left to protect San Antonio with approximately 100 men plus perhaps a few farmers and shopkeepers. Eventually the numbers would increase to slightly over 300 men with the arrival of Colonel Jim Bowie and former U.S. Congressman Davy Crockett and a small band of his Tennessee volunteers.

General Sam Houston was still trying to whip his rag-tag troops into fighting soldiers and were located several days ride from San Antonio. Colonel Jim Fanning and his troops also were days away.

As the Mexican soldiers approached, the Texans barricaded the Alamo mission and converted it into a small fort.

When Santa Anna's army arrived, he gave notice that he would give no quarter and that he would not let up on the attack until every defender of the Alamo was dead. Travis reportedly responded by firing a volley from one of the cannons perched aloft one of the Alamo's walls.

The battle was on.

Santa Anna gave the Texans one hour to clear the fort of all non-combatants – women, children, wounded, the ill, etc.

Help never arrived. For 13 days the small band of Texas fighting men held off the powerful Mexican army buying precious time for Houston and his troops.

The movie dealt with men facing sure death and the courage it took to take a stand for their convictions. In their heart they knew what they had to do for the sake of their wives and children and their future as a free and un-oppressed people.

True to his word, Santa Anna killed every last man who fought at the Alamo. Those that surrendered were executed and all of the bodies were burned.

Every time I watch The Alamo I seem to get a message from a different perspective. This time I was moved by the thoughts going through the minds of men who knew they were just a few hours away from certain death.

However, I also found myself concentrating on just how many ways man can find to inflict pain, horror and death on their fellow man. The weapons of war have changed over the years but man's inhumanity to man has not.

Texas war for independence was followed by a Civil War in the 1860s, in which fellow countrymen butchered and slaughtered one another.

Hitler rolled through Europe in the 1940s in an attempt to exterminate an entire race of people.

In seems that during the course of history, man has continually come up with some lame excuses to kill and destroy. ISIS kills in the name of religion. Peacekeeping nations kill in order to preserve freedom. Countries kill to advance their ideologies or expand their land holdings. The list goes on and on.

"Remember the Alamo!" became the battle cry of the Texan army in the remaining days of the war. The purpose of the chant was to instill the thoughts of the brave men who died to give life to others. Today, we should remember the Alamo for another reason and that is to ask our government leaders, does the killing really have to continue?

Peace and love is much easier to spread than fear, hate and killing.