A new report says that roughly one in three Arkansas teachers leaves the profession after three years on the job.
The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette reports that the Bureau of Legislative Research report highlights stress and workload as the top reasons followed by salary and retirement benefits.

A new report says that roughly one in three Arkansas teachers leaves the profession after three years on the job.
The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette reports that the Bureau of Legislative Research report highlights stress and workload as the top reasons followed by salary and retirement benefits.
Teachers say that more pay and benefits would help improve retention, but that reducing paperwork and administrative burdens was the next priority.
At a joint meeting of the House and Senate education committees, a legislative analyst at the bureau, Ginny Blankenship, said that teachers feel as if they're being asked to so an impossible job without sufficient support. She said teachers also feel as if constantly changing mandates and lack of autonomy in their classroom are affecting their well being and crushing their motivation.
"It's not that they don't want to work hard," Blankenship said. "Most choose to go above and beyond because they love their students."
Blankenship said many teachers complained about unnecessary meetings, unhelpful professional development and the addition of new policies without removing irrelevant rules.
"Those are the same stories we hear," said Rep. Bruce Cozart, R-Hot Springs.
The bureau said in a separate report that there was a high need for special-education teachers, who especially face burdensome paperwork.
"The stress level for special-education teachers, the high level of paperwork — all of those are disincentives for those teaching that field," said Sen. Uvalde Lindsey, D-Fayetteville, who chairs the Task Force on Autism.
He added that the Arkansas Department of Education is looking at the paperwork burden with the aim of reducing it.
The report also listed average teacher salaries at each Arkansas school district. Rogers, the No. 1 district, paid an average of more than $59,700 to teachers. Hughes, which ranked last of the 236 districts, paid an average of more than $35,000. The median salary among all the districts in the state was more than $43,000.