What we need to get this country to turn itself around politically and economically is to get back to God. However, based on previous elections, it seems as thought the priority of most American families is to put more money in the bank account.What we need to get this country to turn itself around politically and economically is to get back to God. However, based on previous elections, it seems as thought the priority of most American families is to put more money in the bank account.

What we need to get this country to turn itself around politically and economically is to get back to God. However, based on previous elections, it seems as thought the priority of most American families is to put more money in the bank account.What we need to get this country to turn itself around politically and economically is to get back to God. However, based on previous elections, it seems as thought the priority of most American families is to put more money in the bank account.
Over the years, we have become a group of people far too dependent on government handouts and it dates all the way back to the Franklin Roosevelt administration in the 1940s. On the surface, Roosevelt’s program called “The New Deal” to help get Americans back on their feet economically following the Great Depression was a noble effort. However, over the years the program eroded into the Great American handout and we have been trying to pull ourselves out of an economic mess almost ever since.
More than 20 years ago, a new business came to Phillips County. At the time, one of the higher ups spoke at a local civic group meeting and reported that the area had plenty of workers but many of those workers lacked strong work ethics. He reported that some workers would receive their paychecks on Wednesday, for example, and take the next couple of days off to spend their earnings, leaving their co-workers in a bind.
Through personal experience, I learned that work ethic is not something that you are born with but it is taught and obtained through on-the-job experience. Until after I graduated from college, my familiarity with the work world was somewhat limited. I worked with a relative during the summer months and gained some valuable knowledge of what was expected of me regarding responsibility.
After graduation, I had a problem finding a position in journalism, so I entered the hard labor market and worked more than 2 and ½ years for a greeting card company. The policy of the company was everyone started at the bottom and I entered the work force as what they called a “material handler” – the military equivalent of a buck private.
My jobs ranged from binding crates to be shipped overseas to hauling materials from the order-filling department to the shipping dock. It was eight hours of almost constant movement and I got in the best physical shape of my life. I eventually got a promotion to dispatcher where part of the job included loading and unloading trailer trucks full of greeting cards.
Needless to say I got discouraged. Here I was operating a power truck and I had a bachelor’s degree in journalism. My dad was my inspiration and repeatedly told me there was nothing wrong with a good, hard day’s work and to continue to do the best that I could in whatever task I was assigned in life.
It took a while but I finally realized that God wanted me at that greeting card factory for a reason. Looking back, I don’t regret the lessons that I learned but primarily I saw that nothing in this life comes free.
Today, frustration sets in when I see plenty of able-bodied young men and women sitting on street corners with cell phones in hand and not contributing a single thing to society. Some even expect their government or their parents to provide them a lifestyle that requires little or no effort on their part. I truly feel sorry for those who choose a life of crime over establishing a career.
It is also sad to see youngsters with dreams that for most people are almost impossible to accomplish. Several years ago, I sat in on a school program in which a motivational speaker attempted to help motivate a group of elementary youngsters to set goals for the future.
Several youngsters told the man that they wanted to be an NBA basketball star. To a 6 or 7-year-old playing basketball for living would be the perfect life – lots and lots of money for playing a kids game. The speaker gave them a reality check, noting that becoming a professional athlete takes dedication and plenty of hard work to accomplish. He also pointed out that very few reach the professional ranks.
At home, youngsters should be encouraged to set achievable goals and keep their focus on their academics. If life calls on them to hard, manual labor then accept the task as a means of developing a strong work ethic.
There are jobs out there for people who are willing to accept more out of life than for the government to pay their way. We need to be telling our young people that there really is no such thing as a job that is not important, or too difficult to accomplish.
A little hard work never hurt anybody