TIP OF THE WEEK

The rules of weight loss are constantly changing-eat this, don’t eat that, take this supplement and do this exercise routine. While eating less and exercising more sounds like a simple formula, finding the right weight loss strategy isn’t always as easy as it seems.
Paul Kriegler, registered dietitian with Life Time, offers several strategies to help drive your weight loss goals and break through those hang-ups.
1. Give the scale a break. Don’t center your weight loss success on a number. A simple scale doesn’t come close to measuring the significant changes happening in your body during your weight loss journey. Instead of focusing on a number each day, notice changes in how your clothes are feeling, and how you feel and move overall.
2. Adjust your media intake. Media is one of the biggest sources for weight loss and health advice, but these messages are typically generalized and based on observational research rather than proven methods and techniques. This can become frustrating and leave a negative impact on your weight loss success. Social media can also leave you feeling defeated.
3. Let your closet be a source of motivation. New clothes are exciting and you almost always want to wear them right away. But if you can’t, allow that wardrobe to fuel the power of your weight loss goals. And if you have favorite outfits that are a size or two bigger than they should be, consider donating them to nudge yourself in the right direction.
4. Pamper yourself. Whether it’s a manicure or a massage, some type of weekly or monthly reward for your hard work is well-deserved and also recommended as part of a healthy lifestyle. Rather than treating yourself with food as a reward, pamper yourself in other ways and reflect on how far you’ve come.
5. Take it one hour at a time. When you’re starting out, losing weight can seem like an overwhelming aspiration. Breaking it down into smaller increments can make it more manageable. Start by having one “healthy hour.” Take the stairs, take a lap around the office at work, or ask for a salad instead of fries with your meal at lunch. As you spend more and more “healthy hours,” pretty soon, your entire week will be healthier.
6. Take pictures to document the process. While it may seem daunting at first, documenting your visual transformation can be a great source of motivation in weight loss. Not only do pictures provide important feedback, but you’ll be able to showcase the fun you’re having while gaining strength and energy living the healthy way of life.
— Brandpoint

CHILDREN’S HEALTH

When it comes to protecting your children from insects this summer, there are several things the FDA urges parents to keep in mind. First, products containing DEET should not be used on children ages 2 months and younger, and products containing oil of lemon eucalyptus should not be used on children younger than 3. Do not allow young children to handle bug sprays, and make sure to wash your child’s skin and clothing once you return indoors to remove residue.
— More Content Now

SENIOR HEALTH

Want to stay sharp as you age? The good news, via a recent report on brain health issued by the National Academy of Sciences’ Institute of Medicine, is that cognitive is not inevitable as we age. A number of things can help you preserve your brain health: aerobic exercise, staying socially active, maintaining a healthy diet and keeping your heart healthy, according to the AARP.
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NEW RESEARCH

The authors of a new study published earlier this month in Annals of Internal Medicine say that the key to a successful weight-loss plan is not picking the plan yourself. Researchers looked at data from 207 veterans, half of whom were given the choice between a low-carb or low-fat diet, and half of whom were assigned a diet without being consulted. The people who were assigned a diet lost slightly more (14.7 pounds) than those who got to select their own plan (12.5 pounds).
— More Content Now

BOOK PICK

‘Yoga for Life,’ by Colleen Saidman Yee

From a rebellious young woman with a dangerous heroin habit to a globe-trotting fashion model to “First Lady of Yoga,” Colleen Saidman Yee tells the remarkable story of how she found herself through the healing power of yoga — and then inspired others to do the same. Approachable, sympathetic, funny, and candid, Saidman Yee shares personal anecdotes along with her compassionate insights and practical instructions for applying yoga to everyday issues and anxieties.
— Atria Books