TIP OF THE WEEK
Whether for medical reasons or by choice, consumer interest in gluten-free foods is on the rise. The U.S. market for gluten-free foods is expected to exceed $6.6 billion by 2017, signaling the practice of cutting consumption of wheat, barley and rye has gone mainstream.
According to research conducted at Texas A&M University, sorghum, a cereal grain grown throughout the world, offers slow digestibility and a lower glycemic index. Foods with a lower glycemic index are believed to increase satiety, which means people feel fuller longer. Thus, the growth of the gluten-free market has led to a renewed interest in sorghum.
Sorghum is proving to be a strong substitute for other grains. White, food-grade sorghum can be milled directly into whole grain flour to produce a wide range of baked goods and flour-based foods such as pizza dough, pastas and cereals.
— Family Features
NUMBER TO KNOW
7,000: The groundwork for pizza was laid in the neolithic age. Italian and French archaeologists have found baked bread in Sardinia that dates back to 7,000 years ago.
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EASY RECIPE: Butternut Squash Tart
Ingredients 3 slices prosciutto, thinly sliced 1 butternut squash 1 sheet puff pastry 1 egg + 1 tablespoon water, beaten 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 10 sage leaves Shaved pecorino cheese
1. Preheat oven to 425. Cover a baking sheet with parchment paper. Place prosciutto onto baking sheet and bake for 15 minutes. Set aside. Reduce temperature to 375. 2. Microwave squash for 3 minutes. Peel. Slice neck into 1/8-inch-thick rounds. 3. Roll the thawed puff pastry into a 12-inch square. Brush pastry with egg wash. Arrange squash slices in an overlapping pattern. Bake for 40 minutes. 4. Heat olive oil over medium-high heat. Working with five leaves at a time, place sage leaves in the hot oil and fry for 20 seconds. Place on a paper towel to drain. 5. Top tart with crumbled prosciutto slices, shaved pecorino cheese and fried sage. Slice and serve.
— Brandpoint
FOOD QUIZ
Cotija cheese is named for a city in which country?
A. El Salvador B. Costa Rica C. Mexico D. Argentina
Answer at bottom of rail.
WORD TO THE WISE
cardoon: A cardoon is a vegetable, also known as the artichoke thistle, that looks a bit like celery on a bad day and has a flavor reminiscent of artichoke hearts and salsify. Popular in Italy, Spain and France, the cardoon is related to the Globe artichoke. An invasive, frost-sensitive plant that needs a lot of space, the cardoon grows as a weed in the Argentine pampas, California and Australia.
— Cookthink
THE DISH ON…
‘Supermarket Healthy’ by Melissa d’Arabian
Everyone wants to feel good about what they are eating, serving guests, and feeding their families, but most of us don't do our weekly shopping at pricey specialty stores — we do it at the local supermarket and we don't want it to break the bank. In her second book, Melissa demystifies the task of preparing nutritious and delicious food by showing exactly how you can make your grocery store work for you. She offers helpful strategies for shopping, cooking, and entertaining, as well as meal blueprints and nutritional information throughout. This book will make you confident about the food you're buying, preparing, and eating.
— Clarkson Potter
FOOD QUIZ ANSWER
C. Cotija cheese is named after the Mexican city in Michoacan.
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