A floragraph image of Michael Gilmore will adorn the Donate Life float in the 2012 Rose Parade on New Year’s Day in Pasadena, Calif. Michael’s image will appear among 70 other organ, eye and tissue donors from 31 states, Canada, Japan and Taiwan, who in their death, helped save, heal and gave hope to thousands of people in need according to a press release issued Mid-South Transplant foundation in Memphis.

 

A floragraph image of Michael Gilmore will adorn the Donate Life float in the 2012 Rose Parade on New Year’s Day in Pasadena, Calif. Michael’s image will appear among 70 other organ, eye and tissue donors from 31 states, Canada, Japan and Taiwan, who in their death, helped save, heal and gave hope to thousands of people in need according to a press release issued Mid-South Transplant foundation in Memphis.
A decorating event for Michael’s floragraph will be held at 10 a.m. in the Hendrix Gallery at Phillips Community College in Helena-West Helena on Tuesday, Dec. 13.
Jerlene Gilmore, Michael’s mother, and his brother and sister, Demarcus and Kaneisha, will fly to Pasadena for the Rose Parade. The theme of the Donate Life float this year is “…One More Day.”
Before his senseless and tragic death, Michael Gilmore’s family described him as a “fun-loving, carefree, outgoing 24-year-old.” Back in April 2010 police found Michael in his apartment near the Arkansas State University campus, dead from a gunshot wound. Police are still searching for the killer.
In his journal entry, Michael wrote, “The meaning of my life is to help others…I was put here to help people some way or somehow.”
Before Michael got his driver’s license, he told his mom that he was going to be an organ donor.
“Why shouldn’t I? I won’t need them,” he told her.
Since Michael’s donation, the family has met Sammy Robinson of Hughes, his heart recipient and Verna Harris of Memphis, one of his kidney recipients. They now desire to meet the others whose Michael’s gifts of life saved.
The family established the Michael Gilmore Scholarship in memory of their son at Phillips College. The scholarship is designated to help provide financial aid for male students at the college accomplish their educational goals and dreams.
Michael’s legacy of his kind spirit and generosity will live on through the donation of his vital organs giving others another chance at life. He is dearly missed but will never be forgotten.
“More than 28,000 lives are saved each year in this country through organ donations. Hundreds of thousands of people need donated corneas and tissue to prevent or cure blindness, heal burns or save limbs,” stated Randa Lipman, community outreach manager for the Mid-South Transplant foundation. “Nearly a third of the 72 honorees on this year’s float were teenagers when they became donors, four became donors as seniors.”