Stay focused.  Pay attention.  Expect the unexpected.

It happens everyday; someone has to slam on his or her brakes to keep from crashing into those haphazard drivers that insist on catching up with the latest gossip on their cell phones.

Stay focused.  Pay attention.  Expect the unexpected.
It happens everyday; someone has to slam on his or her brakes to keep from crashing into those haphazard drivers that insist on catching up with the latest gossip on their cell phones.
Just like you put yourself and other people at risk when you drive drunk, you put yourself and others at risk when you use a cell phone and drive. The level of impairment is very similar.
Crashes due to driver inattention or distraction are on the rise in the United States. They are taking more lives and injuring more people than ever before. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration estimates that 25 percent of all police-reported crashes involve some form of driver inattention.
The U.S. Department of Transportation defines distracted driving as “any non-driving activity a person engages in that has the potential to distract him or her from the primary task of driving and increase the risk of crashing.”
In 2008, nearly 5,900 people died and almost half a million people were injured because of automobile accidents involving a distracted driver, according to the National Automotive Sampling System General Estimates system.
 There are three main types of distractions while driving: eyes off the road (visual); mind off the road (cognitive); and hands off the steering wheel (manual).
Dialing a cell phone increases the risk of an accident driving by 2.8 times.
Text messaging while driving increases the risk of accidents by 23.2 times. The government says texting is the “most alarming” because it involves all three types of distractions.
Drivers should avoid all of these distractions: chatting with friends, cell phone use, text and go, playing DJ with the radio dial, taking food to go, fidgeting with the controls and emotional outbursts.