Two Phillips County men are making use of the 120 plus acres that was once Chicago Mill and Lumber Co. In fact, there's activity at the sight all day long from 6 a.m. until past 4 p.m.

 

Two Phillips County men are making use of the 120 plus acres that was once Chicago Mill and Lumber Co. In fact, there's activity at the sight all day long from 6 a.m. until past 4 p.m.
Danny Wilson and Brice Slane bought the property, which is located just off Washington Street two years ago. The operation, Delta Lumber LLC, is a multi-purpose operation with the frontage on Washington Street being leased to Fayetteville Express Pipeline and Wilbros Construction for their storage and maintenance yard. They now have seven doublewide trailers located at the front of the property.
Wilson and Slane's main business is the timber business, with logs being bought from local individuals and loggers.  Wilson and Slane buy the timber rights from local landowners and hire loggers to go in and bring the timber out. The rough-cut lumber is sold to palate makers and Shannon Brothers in West Memphis and a lot is sold to a local business, Faust Sawmill.
The sawmill operation employs 20 people during the busy season for lumber, which is May 1 through Oct.1, and Wilson says he's hopeful that they can eventually operate the mill year-round, but it all depends on the weather.
Wilson runs the front office, mans the scales and does buying at the front of the yard and Slane runs the back yard or work yard and also does a lot of selling. Logan Jones is in charge of all computer operations for the business.
Wilson started working in the timber business in 1971 at the old Chicago Mill and Lumber Co. and has been at it for the past 39 years. He is a licensed welder and electrician. Slane started in the timber business at age 19 and has been in the business for 21 years.
During the slow timber months, which is right now, they are in the scrap iron business and buy and sell scrap iron. Wilson adds this helps pay the bills and helps keep workers busy when there's no lumber cutting. The operation also buys cola cans for recycling.
Wilson says his day starts around 6 a.m. and the operation closes around 4:30 p.m.
Wilson added that the property had to be checked thoroughly before the pipeline operation could set up headquarters. This must be done in order to make sure there are no artifacts or historical markers on the property.
"I feel like the entire operation is good for Phillips County," says Wilson. The pipeline employees will spend a lot of money while in Phillips County and hopefully they will hire some local people.