In the wake of recent tragedies there is always an overwhelming urge to attempt to place the blame on person, persons or business entities that otherwise have no connection to the incident other than unfortunate circumstances.

In the wake of recent tragedies there is always an overwhelming urge to attempt to place the blame on person, persons or business entities that otherwise have no connection to the incident other than unfortunate circumstances.

Fifty-nine people were ruthlessly murdered in the worst mass murder in this nation's history in Las Vegas. Twenty-six more people were gunned down while worshipping God in a small church just outside San Antonio, Texas. Another similar incident occurred at a small congregation near Nashville, Tennessee. At least nine African Americans were murdered during a worship service in North Carolina. And these are just a few such incidents that I can recall that have happened in the last year or so.

Now come the lawsuits. One of the major network news broadcasts recently reported that civil litigation was being taken against the hotel in Las Vegas from where the gunman launched his attack. The maker of the kit that enabled him to convert his semi-automatic weapon to an automatic weapon with more killing capability is also the target of a lawsuit.

I can't possibly comprehend the grief of the family members of the victims of these tragedies are going through. However, I do understand their need for justice to be served and answers to be found.

The real truth of the matter is that the hotel owners and gunmakers are not responsible for the carnage that has taken place across this country. Ultimately, the responsibility for the untimely deaths of these individuals lies in the hands of the men who pulled the triggers and a system that allows it to happen again and again.

Hundreds of thousands of Americans own guns. Many sit on a shelf in a lockbox and are possessed for the soul purpose of protection of life and property. Others are used for hunting and target shooting. It is an old cliche but well worth repeating here, "Guns don't kill people, people kill people." If all the guns in the world were taken out of circulation today, man would still find a way to kill his fellow man. There would still be bombs and cars.

No one seems to scream about banning knives when a stabbing occurs or putting any kind of restrictions on the use of vehicles or the ingredients used to make bombs. Never mind that the information needed to construct a bomb can be readily found on the Internet.

This country has plenty of gun laws in place but obviously they have failed miserably. These murderers have fallen through the cracks in the system. The current gun laws have not been enforced and violators appear to be rarely prosecuted. Our judicial system is beyond being broke. It is a joke and at this point possibly not repairable.

We should be asking our judges and prosecuting attorneys, "Why are there so many repeat offenders out roaming our streets?"

What we need is strict enforcement of our current gun laws and not more gun laws. I do fully support the ban of assault weapons from being owned by private citizens.

How can a hotel possibly be responsible for the actions an individual commits while a guest. The Las Vegas massacre was a well-planned assault. The government's best law enforcement agents probably couldn't have prevented this incident much less a small, under-armed security detail.

For too long now Americans have been passing the buck regarding the responsibility of mass killings. There is something wrong with a culture that glorifies violence or regards it as a means of sending a message.

The decline of the family structure and the removal of God from our society is largely responsible for the increase in violence in our country. Until everyone comes together with the primary objective to teach our children that there is a peaceful means to settle our differences.

Meanwhile, we will continue to keep putting the blame on the wrong people and places. In other words, we will just keep passing the buck.