The end of innocence occurred on a hot August night way back in 1969 in the affluent suburbs of Los Angeles, California. From the "Summer of Love" in 1967 right up until Woodstock in August of 1969 the Hippy culture preached love and peace while getting high and stoned on everything from alcohol to marijuana to LSD.

The end of innocence occurred on a hot August night way back in 1969 in the affluent suburbs of Los Angeles, California. From the "Summer of Love" in 1967 right up until Woodstock in August of 1969 the Hippy culture preached love and peace while getting high and stoned on everything from alcohol to marijuana to LSD.

"Make love, not war," they cried. They practiced what they preached as sex without responsibility took over.

However, it was not long-lasting.

In a 2-night killing spree, Charles Manson and his followers brutally slaughtered eight innocent people. The savagery of the murders was difficult to read about in the newspaper accounts. Two mass murders were reported in the summer of the previous year. Now, it seems that Americans were beginning to open their eyes to the evil that one human can heap upon another.

Today, we refer to them as "another senseless act of violence."

I was 16 that summer but there was something more frightening than Halloween about the Tate-La Bianca murders. The news reports were bad enough to keep you awake at night. It was also a struggle to keep the gruesome images out of your mind.

Even following the arrest of Manson and his followers,fear gripped the nation. Rumors were widely circulating that Manson had other followers across the country, ready and willing to kill at a moment's notice.

Then, there was the tie-in with The Beatles' double-record "White Album." Manson reported that he was attempting to incite a race war from a cryptic message he received from the song, "Helter Skelter."

"Piggies," the title of another song from album was written on the walls of the houses in the victim's blood.

This was a plot that not even a bad Hollywood horror flick could create.

For a long time, I would not buy that album because of the connotations.

It didn't take long for Paul McCartney to come out with a statement. "We (The Beatles) are all about peace and love...that's all." He explained that "Helter Skelter" referred to an amusement park ride in England and the song itself was just about making noise.

George Harrison said it was "very upsetting" for his music to be associated with such a heinous act of brutality.

It didn't take long for the murders to become part of the Hollywood and media cult. Vincent Bugilosi, who prosecuted Manson and his family, wrote a book about the incident and his experiences called, "Helter Skelter." It was soon tuned into a 2-part made-for-TV movie.

Of course, that was several years later. Even as a young adult I refused to watch the opening moments of the movie despite the fact that filmmakers used much better discretion depicting crime scenes than they do today. Still, I wanted no part of it.

I did watch the trial portion of the movie. The actor portraying Manson bore a striking resemblance to him – almost spooky.

The last scene of Part 1, just after the jury had convicted Manson, showed Bugilosi looking at his brand new wristwatch. He noticed that it had stopped running. He immediately glanced at Manson who had a fiendish smile on his face.

Manson and his family, except one who turned state's evidence, were sentenced to die. However, California abolished the death penalty and Manson lived to the ripe old age of 83. He took to his grave the secrets of his mind control over his so-called family.

Few have become so associated with evil as Manson. However, others such as Hitler and Stalin actually killed and brutalized more people.

Justice was finally pronounced on Manson, after having serving almost 46 years behind bars, on Nov. 19, 2017. Now the personification of evil on this earth will have to answer to a higher power – his maker.