Mom rarely sat down in front of the TV after coming home from church services on Sunday evening. But on this particular night, she seemed to be slightly mesmerized by the performance Jim Morrison and The Doors on The Ed Sullivan Show.

Mom rarely sat down in front of the TV after coming home from church services on Sunday evening. But on this particular night, she seemed to be slightly mesmerized by the performance Jim Morrison and The Doors on The Ed Sullivan Show.

At this time, I was just getting into rock and roll. I owned a few Monkees', Herman's Hermits' and Beatles' albums. My record collection was in its infancy.

September 17, 1967 was the dawning of the age of drugs, sex and rock and roll – not necessarily in that order. The Vietnam War was raging in Southeast Asia. Some wanted to refer to it as a conflict but people by the thousands were being killed; so to me it was a war. I don't remember paying very close attention to Morrison's performance that night. I thought “Light My Fire” had an attention-grabbing tune but I didn't listen very closely to the lyrics.

After Morrison completed the song and took his bows, Mom looked directly at me with her piercing blue eyes and said firmly, “Don't you ever buy any of his records and bring them into this house.”

I was stunned. She had never expressed any disdain for any of my music. I don't even remember her making any negative comments about any other band including The Rolling Stones, who were considered quite vulgar during the 1960s. Sullivan ordered The Stones to change the suggestive lyrics of “Let's Spend the Night Together” to “Let's Spend Some Time Together.” And they complied.

The producers of the Sullivan show also told The Doors to alter the words of “Light My Fire,” which stated “Girl, we couldn't get much higher,” because they strongly suggested or promoted illegal drug use. Unlike the Stones, however, Morrison sang the lyrics as written. It wasn't until years later that I learned they were banned from the Sullivan show.

Frankly, I found songs like “Light My Fire,” “People Are Strange” and “Love Me Two Times” quite weird, both musically and lyrically. Their doom and gloom tunes made The Beatles' pscyhedlic lyrics seem like Alice in Wonderland in comparison.

So, I abided by my mom's wishes. I never bought or brought a Doors song into our house. That is not until the spring of 1971, my senior year, and “Love Her Madly” hit the radio waves. The lyrics were innocent enough as I found myself in the midst of a teenage crush. It was good old rock and roll. So, I broke down and bought the single. I even had the gall to play in Mom's presence but I never told her who the artist was.

For many years after, I had little to do with The Doors music other than listen to it when it played on the radio station that I was listening to at the time. During an episode of “Without A Trace” one of the group's album tracks “The End” was played during a very dramatic scene.

Eventually, I bought a double CD of The Doors Greatest Hits. I played it all the way through just once.

I listened to “The End” and it made the hairs on the back of neck stand up. A few days ago, I watched a documentary about the band on Axis TV on Classic Albums. Their first LP was featured. It had film clips of interviews with Morrison, which simply gave me the creeps. He was so stoned that it was almost as if no one was home in his body.

During the program, the albums producer or engineer played the original recording of “The End” which revealed some extreme vulgar profanity that was mixed down and was not audible in the released recording.

Today, I still get an eerie feeling when “Riders on the Storm” plays on the radio.

Sorry Mom, I should have listened. The Doors are not played on my CD player anymore.

Jim Morrison died of apparent heart failure on July 3, 1971.