“And that's the way it is ….” For 19 years that was Walter Cronkite's catchphrase as he signed off the CBS Evening News. During the 1960s and 1970s, opinion polls cited Cronkite as “the most trusted man in America.”

“And that's the way it is ….” For 19 years that was Walter Cronkite's catchphrase as he signed off the CBS Evening News. During the 1960s and 1970s, opinion polls cited Cronkite as “the most trusted man in America.”

During that era you could honestly believe that the television news media was giving you an unbiased picture of the “most important” stories of the day. The stories that affected the lives of honest, hard-working Americans. At the end of the newscast, there was simply no way to determine one way or another whether Cronkite was a conservative Republican or a liberal Democrat. And that my friends is the way news should be presented.

Cronkite reported many major news events between 1937 and 1981 including the bombings in World War II, the Nuremberg trials, the Vietnam War, Watergate, and the assassinations of President John F. Kennedy, civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr., and Beatle John Lennon. He was also known for his extensive U.S. space program coverage including Project Mercury, the moon landings and the space shuttles.

You could say that the grandfatherly Cronkite was one of the reasons this aspiring writer decided to become a journalist.

Today, there is no question that the TV media has a heavy liberal agenda. All three major networks as well as some of the top cable news moguls bend to the extreme left.

Reporters now frequently express their own opinion on the topic before the anchor turns the story over to an “expert analyst,” who in turn tells you exactly how you should feel about the story that is going down. It's almost as if the media moguls believe that Joe and Jane Citizen don't have enough common sense of their own to draw their own conclusions and form their own opinions.

Flashy images on the TV screen are frequently used to stir up emotions. Scenes of riots, police brutality and other incidents of violence tend to get people worked into a frenzy. I was once told that it was probably best to read a story first without the visual impact before viewing it on television.

The six basic questions of journalism are Who? What? When? Where? How? and Why? Depending on the situation any one of those basic question can be the most important item, or lead, in a news story. If a reporter answers those questions he or she has done their job well.

With social media now heavily involved in the news process, things have become even more difficult for legitimate news organization to sort out all the “fake” news. It is a difficult job. However, we encourage our colleagues in the TV news business to revaluate themselves regarding fairness and objectivity.

We should all be able to sit back and watch the evening news and have the anchor to confidently tell us “And that's the way it is.”

We thank Walter Cronkite for his leading by example.