When I decided to stop watching National Football League and National Basketball Association games I thought I would find myself going through some type of withdrawal like twiddling my thumbs on Sunday afternoon and Monday nights. However, such has not been the case.

I decided to quit watching professional football and professional basketball for a wide variety of reasons. The chiefest was frankly I was sick and tired of watching all the chest-thumping dunks, endless end zone celebrations and the ridiculous taunting and trash talking that takes place in both of these sports.

When I decided to stop watching National Football League and National Basketball Association games I thought I would find myself going through some type of withdrawal like twiddling my thumbs on Sunday afternoon and Monday nights. However, such has not been the case.

I decided to quit watching professional football and professional basketball for a wide variety of reasons. The chiefest was frankly I was sick and tired of watching all the chest-thumping dunks, endless end zone celebrations and the ridiculous taunting and trash talking that takes place in both of these sports.

A few years back, I dropped the NBA because of the Charles Barkley's, Bill Laimbeer's and Dennis Rodman's, who all talked a better game than they actually played. It got almost silly. The same teams won year after year – primarily the Boston Celtics and the Los Angeles Lakers. It became the ultimate bore with such high scoring affairs as 125-120.

Where's the defense?

Establishing a favorite NBA team was very difficult back in the early 60s and 70s because they didn't stick in one place for very long. I started out as a loyal St. Louis Hawks fan but they flew South to Atlanta. The old ABA moved into Memphis and I pulled for the Pros, Tams, Sounds for the five or six years they were in the Bluff City. When they moved on to Baltimore and eventually folded, I began to root for Pete Maravich and the New Orleans Jazz but that was short-lived too, as Maravich was traded and the Jazz moved on to Salt Lake City.

After a three- or four-year hiatus, my interest in the NBA returned when the Vancouver Grizzles became the Memphis Grizzlies.

My love for the NFL dates as far back as my love of the game of baseball – 1963 to be exact. It didn't take long for me to realize that baseball didn't last year round and there had to be something to fill in the time between the World Series and spring training.

So, I began buying football cards just as I did baseball cards in the summer. Soon, I learned about such football greats as Johnny Unitas, Jim Brown and Bart Starr, just to name a few. That year, the annual Green Bay Packers, Detroit Lions game became almost as much of a Thanksgiving tradition in our house as Macy's Christmas Parade.

In the early years my team loyalties bounced about. I liked the Baltimore Colts and Johnny Unitas as well as Bart Starr and the Green Bay Packers. Soon, I began watching the game of the week on Sundays after church with Dad. He was a staunch St. Louis Cardinals fan and so I became a Cardinal supporter until they too moved to another city.

I briefly supported the Dallas Cowboys and the New Orleans Saints. However, I became a die-hard Tennessee Titans fan when the Houston Oilers transplanted to Nashville. I actually became a fan the year before they relocated to Tennessee.

Over the years the game of professional football and basketball have changed, primarily due to the influence of television. The games became more and more predictable. In the NBA, the teams with the most popular players won the titles on almost every occasion – Magic Johnson, Larry Bird, Michael Jordan and LeBron James, for example. After Ray Lewis and Peyton Manning won Super Bowls their retirement years I became suspicious and skeptical of the results of some of the "big games."

Today, there are way too many "pro" players that are such hot dogs there isn't enough mustard to go round to cover them – from silly dances in the end zone to beating their chests after sacking the quarterback when their team is trailing 52-10. Also, the NFL and NBA rosters have become dotted with a lengthy list of jail birds, some of whom beat their spouses and/or their children.

To sum it up, the pros have become very "unprofessional" sending a message of poor sportsmanship to the young people that watch the games.

Then, along comes politics. Sorry, I can't support the kneeling during the National Anthem. Disrespect is intended. The National Anthem has absolutely nothing to do with a few rogue cops that plague our country. Certainly, these athletes have no problem reaping the benefits to be had in this great county.

Recently, TV ratings dropped a sharp 11 percent for NFL broadcasts. It has truly become the sport of kings. Put this in proper perspective, a schoolteacher would have to work 37 years to pay for one 30-second spot of advertising on an NFL telecast.

I was going to give the NFL one more shot this September. No one knelt on sidelines for the Titans during the post-game ceremony. So, I watched the entire first half as the Titans rolled to a big halftime lead over the Minnesota Vikings only to blow it late in the fourth quarter. It looked like it was almost scripted from the previous season.

As I turned it off, I said to myself, "No more. No more."

Oh, I admit that I occasionally check the scores on my Associated Press app but you might ask, "Do you miss the NFL and the NBA?" My honest answer would be, "No, not really."