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The Helena Arkansas Daily World - Helena, AR
  • Random Thoughts on Too much technology

  • At age 61 I can write about the “good old days” until I turn blue in the face but there comes a time to finally admit that we will never get back to the way things used to be. In a sense that is a shame because the children and grandchildren of this dying “baby boomer” generation will never know what it was like to live in a kinder, gentler time.
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  • At age 61 I can write about the “good old days” until I turn blue in the face but there comes a time to finally admit that we will never get back to the way things used to be. In a sense that is a shame because the children and grandchildren of this dying “baby boomer” generation will never know what it was like to live in a kinder, gentler time.
    As far as technology is concerned we are much further advanced than I ever imagined back in my childhood days. I would have never dreamed that I would someday be able to purchase my favorite TV programs on a disc and watch them over and over again, anytime I so wished. I would have never thought that I would be sending typed messages over a telephone that I kept strapped to my belt. Even more amazing is the phone also serves as mini-computer, flashlight, and camera and so much more, all in one small package.
    Even my chosen profession has experienced a major overhaul. I had no idea that one day I could sit down at my desk, compose and write stories without filling my wastebasket and actually design an entire publication on a computer screen. I never imagined that I would take photos without developing film and printing the negatives.
    Of course my parents’ generation never thought that they would be sitting comfortably inside their homes under an air conditioner during the dreaded heat of the long summer months. They also couldn’t believe they could be entertained in their own home through the magic of television instead of having to fork over a hard-earned quarter to go to the movies on a Saturday night.
    For most Americans, life has become easy. Maybe too easy. Somewhere along the line we have paid a big price for the advancement of technology. Today, many parents use smart phones, video games and computers as babysitters instead of spending some much needed quality time with their children.
    With the advancement of technology has also come the unquenchable desire for more. New smart phones and computers are coming off the assembly line faster than the consumer can snap them up.
    The purpose of this week’s essay is not to condemn modern marvels. I will be the first to admit that I enjoy DVDs, the high quality sound of CDs and the handiness of the iPhone. But like the technology advancements of the past, it seems the more modern we become the farther and farther we drift away from the family unit. It seems the social media has become a more important way of communicating than one-on-one discussions.
    Doomsday prophets warned my generation of the dangers of television as far back as the early to mid-60s. They warned of its potential powerful influence. That prediction has come true. Youngsters today get more of their philosophy of life from the “boob tube” than they do from the advice of the mothers and fathers. 
    Page 2 of 2 - At one time TV was a responsible medium. Many of the programs produced had lessons on life to be learned. As a new generation took over the medium, it quickly became a vast wasteland of decadence. What a shame. It has the potential to do so much good.
    I don’t know what the future holds as far as the advancement of technology. It is exciting to try to imagine what my grandchildren will live to see and experience. However, I do know that no matter what man discovers or invents it will never be able to replace the interaction of love that is found in the home. I truly hope that our society is not determined to destroy the family structure, as we once knew it.
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