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The Helena Arkansas Daily World - Helena, AR
  • Annual KBT Golf Classic to benefit MDA this weekend

  • All golf enthusiasts are urged to participate in the annual King Biscuit Time Charity Golf Classic this Saturday and Sunday at the West Helena Municipal Golf Course. The 2-man scramble will tee-off at 8:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. All proceeds will go to support the Muscular Dystrophy Association.
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  • All golf enthusiasts are urged to participate in the annual King Biscuit Time Charity Golf Classic this Saturday and Sunday at the West Helena Municipal Golf Course. The 2-man scramble will tee-off at 8:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. All proceeds will go to support the Muscular Dystrophy Association. MDA is the world's leading nonprofit health organization sponsoring research seeking the cause of and effective treatments for neuromuscular diseases. “This is the 25th annual King Biscuit Time Charity Golf Classic,” stated Elaine Canady, MDA advocate. “It's for a great cause. Without our corporate sponsors like Isle of Capri in Lula, Ludwig Distributing and KFFA Radio Station, we wouldn't be able to make this event possible.” Canady knows all too well the affect MD can have on one's body. Muscular Dystrophy is a group of muscle diseases that weaken the musculoskeletal system and hamper locomotion-in other words weakens the muscles and causes lack of movement within limbs and different parts of the body. “Muscular dystrophy is characterized by progressive skeletal muscle weakness, defects in muscle proteins, and the death of muscle cells and tissue,” said Canady. The prognosis for people with muscular dystrophy varies according to the type and progression of the disorder. Some cases may be mild and progress very slowly over a normal lifespan, while others produce severe muscle weakness, functional disability and loss of the ability to walk. Some children with muscular dystrophy die in infancy while others live into adulthood with only moderate disability. The muscles affected vary, but can be around the pelvis, shoulder, face or elsewhere. Muscular dystrophy can affect adults, but the more severe forms tend to occur in early childhood. “The way my doctor once explained it to me was each child during conception takes good genes and bad genes from their parents,” stated Canady. “Well instead of taking one good and one bad gene, I was born with two bad genes.” According to Canady there is no known cure for muscular dystrophy, although significant headway is being made. Physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy and orthopedic instruments (e.g., wheelchairs and standing frames) may be helpful. Inactivity, such as bed rest, sitting for long periods and bodybuilding efforts to increase myofibrillar hypertrophy can worsen the disease. “There is no specific treatment for any of the forms of muscular dystrophy,” Canady explained. Physiotherapy, aerobic exercise, low intensity anabolic steroids, prednisone supplements may help to prevent contractures and maintain muscle tone. Orthoses (orthopedic appliances used for support) and corrective orthopedic surgery may be needed to improve the quality of life in some cases. MD takes a toll on the body and mind both physically and emotionally. There is no known cure at this time but here are a few things that you can do to help find a cure: donate, volunteer, educate yourself, attend events and programs for MD, support those around you, give a gift in memory and give a gift in honor. According to Canady the proceeds collected will go toward the research, equipment, consolations, professional fees and repairs to medical equipment needed. Rental carts will be available but golfers are encouraged to reserve them early, as they are limited. Canady reports that prizes will be given for a hole-in-one, longest drives and closet to the pin. “We're going to have fun while supporting and creating a greater awareness for a great cause,” Canady concluded.
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