An interesting concept of converting transportation fuel needs to natural gas arose at the Rotary Luncheon Wednesday as renewable energy manager for the Arkansas Energy Office J.D Lowery provided a breakdown of the conversion.

An interesting concept of converting transportation fuel needs to natural gas arose at the Rotary Luncheon Wednesday as renewable energy manager for the Arkansas Energy Office J.D Lowery provided a breakdown of the conversion.
“Natural gas powers more than 100,000 vehicles in the United States and roughly about 11.2 million vehicles world wide,” said Lowery.  “Natural gas vehicles are a good choice for high-mileage fleets such as buses and taxis that are centrally fueled or operate within a limited area. The advantages of natural gas as an alternative fuel include its domestic availability, widespread distribution infrastructure, low cost compared with gasoline and clean burning qualities."
According to Lowery natural gas is an odorless, nontoxic gaseous mixture of hydrocarbons-predominately methane (CH4).  Lowery explained that because it is a gas it must be stored onboard a vehicle in either a compressed gaseous or liquefied state. 
"Compressed Natural Gas and liquefied natural gas helps us to be more efficiently green and less dependent on oil," continued Lowery. 
Much like the gasoline that is stored in tanks, LNG is super cooled and then stored in special insulated tanks.