Temperatures hovered in the mid-30s in Helena-West Helena on that Thursday, January 13 day but for local postal workers it was a “dog day afternoon.” Two separate incidents involved the post office, dogs and the Humane Society of the Delta.

 

Temperatures hovered in the mid-30s in Helena-West Helena on that Thursday, January 13 day but for local postal workers it was a “dog day afternoon.” Two separate incidents involved the post office, dogs and the Humane Society of the Delta.
The first case involved a white dog that had been hanging around the federal building in Helena according to HSD Director Kathryn Freres. Postal customers had been asking about the dog – some wanted to feed him.
This was one lucky dog, commented Freres. HSD representative Regina Clifton happened to drop by the post office on that cold day. It was love at first sight.  Clifton knelt down near him to see whether of not he was friendly. Apparently Barkley, as he was later named, knew just what to do to melt Clifton’s heart.
Without a plan of where she could take him, Clifton took the dog to work with her. Knowing that Barkley could not stay there, Clifton used Facebook to spread Barkley’s story. She was fortunate enough to find him his forever home.
Later that same day, postal worker Renard Love ran into Freres and asked her advice about what to do about an aggressive dog that had been attacking him while delivering the mail. Love told Freres that he believed the dog had a litter of puppies under a burned out house in the neighborhood. Freres went with Love to check out the situation and sure enough she found evidence that the dog was protecting her puppies.
“Due to the great hiding place for the pups under the house and the fact that it was going to be well below freezing, I needed help,” said Freres.
The help came in the form of Justin Clifton and Joe Gualtieri, who crawled under the house and chased the pups. They handed them out to Freres through the nearest openings.
“Thanks to all the hard work, all eight pups and their mother were rescued,” said Freres.
On January 19, Jim Chastain and Freres transported 33 puppies, including the eight from the burned out house, halfway to a “no kill” rescue team from Illinois.
Freres also reported that about 25 KIPP students and few teachers helped clean up HSD’s small building. They cleaned up fallen debris, insulation and ceiling tile. During this time, the KIPP students socialized with the rescue pups. They also learned about and helped with all of the medical requirements the pups needed to be transported to the Illinois facility. This included parvo testing, distemper shots and de-worming.
The KIPP School had contacted the HSD about any volunteer work they could contribute.
“We were thrilled to get their help,” stated Freres. “We want to thank everyone for their continued support and particularly the KIPP students.”
Freres stated that anyone that has pups four months or younger that need transportation to the Illinois facility should contact HSD at (870) 228-2859.