The coordinator says the Phillips County-sponsored summer youth work apparently has been working well. If only the Phillips County Quorum Court’s Budget Committee had received better news Monday night about some roads and bridges that are in serious disrepair.

 

The coordinator says the Phillips County-sponsored summer youth work apparently has been working well. If only the Phillips County Quorum Court’s Budget Committee had received better news Monday night about some roads and bridges that are in serious disrepair.
Cotrena Baker, the summer youth program coordinator, told the budget panel the program did well in June because “100 youth were gainfully employed and we managed to stay within our allotted budget.”
 Speaking on behalf of the Ridge and Bridge program, Kathy Davis said Phillips County Road 210 and others in the Lexa and Southland area “are just like washboards."
Pointing out that most county roads are graveled, Phillips County Judge Don Gentry said it would take more than $1 million just to replace one bridge and a lot more money to gravel dirt roads.
 “At this time what we don’t need is heavy traffic such as heavy equipment traveling over these bridges,” Gentry said.
   Davis said there was only one serviceable road in her area and that during the past five years she had torn up several vehicles traveling on those roads.
 Davis told the panel she had learned that more than $20 million was available for counties for road repair.
Gentry said Phillips County only receives $200,000 in state turn back funds for roadwork and that he had tried to maximize those funds. Gentry agreed with Davis that Southland Road needed the asphalt overlay, but that the county could not afford the project.
Clausey Myton, the budget committee chairman, suggested that the county explore the possibility of funds for road projects.
 Roy King, a bus driver for the Veterans services, told the panel he traveled to the Veterans Hospital in Memphis virtually every week day and that he had logged a lot of overtime.
 "What I am asking for is that you do the right thing by me," King said. "There is seldom a day that I do not work over eight hours in order to transport veterans to and from the Memphis hospital. I have full confidence that you can resolve this problem.”
Justice C.R. Walker concurred that King should be paid for the overtime he worked.
David Anderson, the Veterans Services coordinator, asked the Budget Committee to consider making his position and that of the van driver full-time.
"I had to get up at 5 a.m. this morning because the van was inoperable," said Anderson.
  Anderson said 20 to 25 veterans are transported to hospitals every week.   
  Gentry suggested that the VS office cut back to its original three-day work schedule.
Terrance Clark, who is involved with the Phillips County Incubator Program, said the county should consider a good-faith donation to the program being partnered with Phillips County Community College of the University of Arkansas and the Phillips County Chamber of Commerce.
Clark said the incubator would help new businesses write their plans, logos, web sites, signage, menus or whatever they need.
 The panel decided to consider the incubator before the full court.
 Constable Rickey Wheeler asked for mileage reimbursement but was told that a state law enacted in July 2009 disallowed per diem.
 The panel agreed with a request from Phillips County Treasurer Becky Gattas to pay $1,115 for firewall equipment on her office computer server.