“Pass the biscuit” has aired for the 16,000th time.

    With a room full of folks looking on in the Delta Cultural Center visitor’s center during the noon hour Tuesday, Blues Music Hall of Famer Sonny Payne presented KFFA’s 16,000th broadcast of the King Biscuit Time.

 

Pass the biscuit” has aired for the 16,000th time.
    With a room full of folks looking on in the Delta Cultural Center visitor’s center during the noon hour Tuesday, Blues Music Hall of Famer Sonny Payne presented KFFA’s 16,000th broadcast of the King Biscuit Time.
   Joining Payne were Bobby Rush, a legendary Blues performer and recipient of the Blues Hall of Fame award in 2009; Trey Berry, director of museums with the Department of Arkansas Heritage, and Jim Davis, director of communications from Crowley Ridge Technical Institute at Forrest City.
   Payne led off the broadcast with one of Sonny Boy Williamson’s classic followed by “She’s All Right” in honor of Rush who told the listening audience that he had just released his 249th song entitled “Blind Snake.”
   Cajoling Payne a bit, Rush told Payne, “It’s always good to be around you,” noting that the two had been close friends for 55 years.
   Rush expressed personal pride that he was chosen to the Blues of Hall of Fame last year – an honor that was “a long time coming.”
   Payne echoed Rush’s sentiments stating that “I was proud but I was scare to death,” when he accepted his accolade at Memphis recently.
   Noting that he was born at Stuttgart, which made him “from the Delta”, Berry looked straight at Payne in saying, “There’s nobody over you.”
    Payne paid his dues to KFFA owner Jim Howe when he reeled off some of Howe’s many accomplishments – “Dixieland music to farming and owner of KFFA.”
   Howe replied: “We’re glad to be here and hope we have another 1,000 hours under our belt.”
    When asked for his thoughts about King Biscuit Time’s long history, Howe recalled that the 15,000th broadcast took place on July 3, 2006 at the Malco Theatre.
    “The very first broadcast was in late November 1941,” Howe said.
    Rose Seaton, who has been with KFFA for 11 years including the last five as station manager, said she discovered when reading the history of the King Biscuit Time that “farmhands came in from the field during their lunch time to listen to the program.”
    Thanking Payne for the opportunity to be on the program, Davis said, “We feel appreciative to be a part of the 16,000th broadcast.”
    Visitors came from across Arkansas and Mississippi to witness the occasion including Roger Stolle, owner of Cat Head in Clarksdale and creator of the Juke Joint Festival held annually in April, and Rob Johnson, sales manager for KXJK/KBFC at Forrest City.
    Howe said Johnson formerly worked for KFFA.
    Traveling from Parma, Italy to visit the Delta were Michele Paglia and Giacomo Lagrasta. Stolle said the two started Rootsway Blues and Food Festival in their native Parma.     “Parma is where all that good Italian Parmesan cheese is made,” Stolle said.