Larry Cummings, 41, was charged Friday after allegedly burglarizing the home of Gladys Morse on Nov. 7 and encouraging a 15-year-old who accompanied Cummings to kick and stomp Morse's dogs, Deputy Prosecutor Wes Bradford said in circuit court documents.

The Humane Society of the United States said Wednesday a recent Newton County criminal case illustrates the need for stricter animal cruelty laws in Arkansas.
The society called upon prosecutors "to settle for nothing less than a meaningful period of detention, psychological counseling and a ban on contact with animals upon any conviction in this case," according to a news release from the group.
Larry Cummings, 41, was charged Friday after allegedly burglarizing the home of Gladys Morse on Nov. 7 and encouraging a 15-year-old who accompanied Cummings to kick and stomp Morse's dogs, Deputy Prosecutor Wes Bradford said in circuit court documents.
Also, the documents said, Cummings entered a dog pen that same day, on the property of Eula Finch, and used a cattle prod to repeatedly shock two small, white dogs.
Cummings, who has at least four prior felony convictions, was charged as an habitual offender with felony burglary, two counts of animal cruelty, and contributing to the delinquency of a minor. Bradford said Cummings burglarized Morse's home to hurt the dogs.
The juvenile also was charged with felony burglary and two counts of animal cruelty.
Animal cruelty in Arkansas is a misdemeanor and legislative attempts to make the offense a felony have failed in recent sessions.
The Humane Society says Arkansas' animal cruelty law is one of the nation's weakest. Only four other states have no felony animal cruelty law: Idaho, Mississippi, North Dakota and South Dakota.