The Humanity Society of the Delta has agreed to prepare a plan for an animal shelter after meeting Tuesday with Helena-West Helena Aldermen Jay Hollowell and Joe St. Columbia Sr.

The Humanity Society of the Delta has agreed to prepare a plan for an animal shelter after meeting Tuesday with Helena-West Helena Aldermen Jay Hollowell and Joe St. Columbia Sr.
Gathering in Hollowell’s Helena National Building offices – with Mayor James Valley present – the group headed by Gloria Higginbotham agreed to present the proposal at the ad hoc committee’s next meeting at 3:30 p.m. on Aug. 12, also to be held in Hollowell’s offices.
“I believe we’re making real progress,” Higginbotham said after the second such meeting.
Stating “crunching figures” has been the key to bringing the group’s planned animal shelter to fruition, Higginbotham said, “It will take several hundred thousand dollars to build what we want.”
Higginbotham said her group has a “temporary site” capable of handling a small number of dogs.
“We have adopted out several (dogs),” she said.
“I have seen it and it’s very nice,” said Michele Page, who has been working with the group for a good while.
Page said she knew of one mobile clinic “with little kennels” she has found through research. Page said the unit consisted of veterinarians who administer dog vaccinations and annual license tags.
Hollowell said he would mention the group’s action at the Helena-West Helena City Council meeting 6 p.m. next Tuesday at Helena city hall.
Hollowell and St. Columbia met with Valley following the ad hoc meeting to “bring him up to speed” on the discussion with the Humane Society of the Delta.
“There won’t be any action on the issue until our Aug. 19 meeting,” Hollowell told The Daily World by phone. “We want the (Higginbotham’s) group to have the proposal in hand.”
Early on in the discussion, Hollowell said the city council would likely be receptive to working with the Humane Society of the Delta as it would with other non-profit organizations.
St. Columbia said he didn’t see any problem “getting the funds” for the shelter.
Higginbotham said her group could “get a lot more grants if we owned it.”
She has preferred that her non-profit group have control of the planned animal shelter because “I feel like the (Phillips) County and the city can’t sustain us.”