The fire engine, previously stored at one of Bentonville's other fire stations, is used annually during downtown Winter Wonderland parades. The city celebrated the completion of the vehicle's new home in a public dedication ceremony last week.

"As we look to the future, I want to keep an eye on the past — on the guys that went before us," Battalion Chief Larry Horton said during the event.

The new main Bentonville Fire Station is preserving history with a "little museum" in the foyer.
"That lobby is a focal point for everyone coming into the station. We intended it to be — to show our history and display things we had put back in corners and closets" of the old fire station, Fire Chief Dan White said.
A large spotlight from one of those storage areas will be placed back on the front of a 1935 Ford truck that was used as a fire engine until the early 1980s and is now the centerpiece of the lobby.
The fire engine, previously stored at one of Bentonville's other fire stations, is used annually during downtown Winter Wonderland parades. The city celebrated the completion of the vehicle's new home in a public dedication ceremony last week.
"As we look to the future, I want to keep an eye on the past — on the guys that went before us," Battalion Chief Larry Horton said during the event.
Display cases with old-time fire equipment, historical photographs and documents and several donated toy fire trucks also show the tradition-oriented character of the fire department, White said.
The 1935 engine won't pump water, White said, "and we don't expect it to ever pump water again."
But the engine will be restored, thanks to Lt. Tony Grimes and his family's donation of $15,000 for the project. Grimes' grandfather, Walter Grimes, bought and converted the truck into a fire engine in 1935. Walter Grimes died in 1979.
The Bentonville City Council recently approved a resolution that promises the Grimes family the truck will remain in the care of the Bentonville Fire Department.
Grimes contacted his grandfather's three surviving children, Mary Gitlemen, Mesa Harris and Dick Grimes, for help in paying for most of the restoration costs.
After explaining that the city had designed the lobby around the fire engine, "They said, 'No problem,'" Grimes said.
"We're going to try to get it back as original as possible," he said.
Automobile restoration expert Ray Pearce has volunteered to work at a reduced price, Grimes said.
Grimes said he's proud of the restoration project, the new fire station and being a Bentonville firefighter..
"This truck was pre-Wal-Mart. My family was pre-Wal-Mart. This is my hometown. I never wanted to be a fireman anywhere else," Grimes said.
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Information from: The Morning News, http://www.nwaonline.net/